Silence isn’t golden: Crisis management through social media

"Future Music Festival 2011" by Eva RinaldiSocial media is now an incredibly important tool for communication both when things are going well and when crisis hits. Twitter and Facebook will often be the first port of call for both the public and the media seeking updates on incidents. If those updates aren’t there, they’ll draw their own conclusions or find them elsewhere.

When things go wrong, a festival can face hundreds of tweets about issues such as over-crowding, a shutdown, or a slow evacuation. On many occasions, however, none comes from the official Twitter feed.

If a festival says nothing, a stream of misunderstandings, unverified updates, and untruths spread through tweets from people both on and offsite. A journalist at the event can became a key source of information, despite only being there as a festivalgoer and having no more access to official updates than anybody else.

Large scale events are also a slave to the weather and knock-on effects such as traffic jams can create havoc.

In these situations, any statements and advice issued via Twitter can be pushed down the feed by regular updates extolling what a great time is being had by all who have managed to get on site. For those still stuck and looking to Twitter for official information, this can serve largely to antagonise them. A situation then develops where those people then tweet themselves and speak about their complaints.

Often, the problem can be that the wrong people are operating events’ social media accounts. In many cases, the ‘social media strategy’ is simply telling interns to go out and keep people updated on how much fun they’re having. But an intern is not qualified to deal with logistical queries or complaints – which may come at any point during an event – nor manage information flow when major problems arise.

All events have plans and systems in place for when the unexpected happens, but social media is not always considered within this. If the public and the press can’t see that something is being done, the fast pace of information online means opinion of an event can quickly turn.

Here are five top tips for crisis management through social media:

1. Designate a social media manager
The moment something goes wrong, someone with the authority to speak for you should be able to take over or direct social media updates.

2. Provide clear information promptly
Make it clear that you know that something is wrong and that you are dealing with it as soon as possible, even if it is not immediately possible to go into details. Removing any content from your website that might no longer be suitable is something to consider.>

3. Ensure that important updates aren’t lost
When you need to relay important information, ensure that it’s at the top of your social media feeds for as long as possible. This could mean pinning it to the top of your Facebook feed or ceasing all other updates completely.

4. Know when to stop being positive
A continuation of point three, but it’s important to know when positive updates about what’s happening at your event should stop, even if only temporarily.

5. Address rumours quickly
Rumours will spread fast at a festival, especially if people don’t have up to date information from its organisers. Monitor the spread of rumours both on and off site and address them promptly. Without an official message early on, rumours can be picked up by official news sources and become a lot more difficult to address further down the line.

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Photo credit: Eva Rinaldi

Kitsuné drops its new ‘Parisien’ compilation

ParisienWithout making a fuss, Kitsuné proudly wears its French heart on its sleeve. So it was logical for the Paris-based brand to launch the ‘Parisien’ compilation series (and the t-shirt range that goes with it) in collaboration with one of Paris’ best exports, graffiti artist and international hipster André who designs the artwork.

Following in the footsteps of the Kitsuné Maison compilations’ concept dedicated to presenting the best new artists from all around the world, the ‘Parisien’ series regularly showcase hot, fresh talent from Paris… and as it goes, the rest of France. No room for elitism here, simply the best new music from Gallic shores.

Call it the new French Touch or whatever you like, this is the new blood which is shaking the City of Lights in 2013. In 13 tracks, Kitsuné gives you the lowdown on what’s cooking around the capital and beyond. These days, many newcomers produce stylish electronic sketches from very little: cracked software and budget laptops. They are tomorrow’s important producers sharpening their knives in their bedrooms. It’s this perspective which makes “Kitsuné Parisien” such a invaluable document of the talent currently blooming in the capital.

Look out for the Kitsuné Easter BANK HOLIDAY SPECIAL on Thursday 28th March @ Village Underground featuring Aeroplane, The Twelve’s, Gigamesh, Dena (Live) + Guest.

Flow Festival announces headliners

Flow Festival - Helsinki, Finland 7th - 11th August 2013Flow Festival – Helsinki, Finland 7th – 11th August 2013

The Guardian, August 2012 – “The now defunct Suvilahti power plant in Helsinki plays host to four days of new music in an impressive industrial landscape of gas cylinders and smoke stacks.”

Now in its tenth year, Finland’s biggest music festival have revealed its international headliners to their growing UK audience. Flow is synonymous with creating an exciting mishmash of musical talent, from old school legends to topical newcomers, Scandia’s finest and a whole host of international talent. This year is no exception. Flow will kick off its opening ceremony with elusive Swedish duo The Knife, ready to unleash their forthcoming album to a hyped festival crowd. Joining them will be Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Solange, Mykki Blanco, afro beat hero Ebo Taylor, Karenn (Blawan & Pariah), Azealia Banks, Finnish electro outfit Sarah Kivi & Non Orchestra and Rough Trade’s favourite Swedes, Goat, with many more acts still to be announced. Returning to the historic Suvilahti, a short walk away from the centre of Helsinki, the festival strikes an alluring setting for a few days of blissed-out festival escapism. Held in the shadows of a disused power station built at the turn of the century, the looming location is one of Helsinki’s most monumental architectural sites. Embracing its penchant for urban spaces and modern art, Flow’s venue sets it aside as one of the most exciting and innovative festivals of the summer. Beyond the music, Flow offers a warm embrace of the arts, offering art displays from Scandinavia and abroad as well as showcasing art house film, cinema, lectures and an exceptional array of world spanning cuisine. There’s easily enough to keep attendees occupied, if ever spending a summer weekend in culture hub Helsinki wasn’t enough. In honour of their landmark tenth anniversary, Flow has announced an exclusive 10% off UK ticket prices for adventurous festival-goers in search of something a little different. Flow Festival remains a unique music festival defined by its passions: award winning musical acts, pioneering arts and an ethical mindset. Prepare to be inspired, intrigued and delighted in unexpected ways this August.

Telegraph, 2012 – “This art-filled urban festival, on the site of an old power plant near the city center, is compact, but a lot of thought has gone into creating a variety of colourful entertainment places.”

Clash Magazine, 2012 – “it’s a relaxed and attractive place.”